Your Income Tax Declaration

Declaration Tax : In many countries, like the United States, residents are not required to file an income tax unless they exceed a certain amount or are not citizens. In France however, all residents that spend more than 183 days out of the calendar year in France are required to file an income tax.  

Since you are a student, your income will not be substantial and thus easy to file. Even if your income is zero, you should still file the forms. It’s a show of good faith as a French resident that you are following procedure and complying with the bureaucracy, much like obtaining good credit by paying your bills on time. It will help you in the long run, should you ever seek a permanent residence card or naturalization. It also may increase your CAF benefits and may exempt you from the taxe de habitation. (See this article.)

Some of you will have part-time jobs or paid internships during your time in Paris, both of which need to be declared. (Obviously, unpaid internships do not need to be declared.) If your internship or part-time job is less than 3 months, you do not need to declare it. If you are still unsure, consult with your employer.

 

What amount should you  add to your declaration ?

If you are under 26 years old on January 1st of the year of tax (1st january 2017 for the year of revenue taxes 2017 ) and that you are a student, your salaries are exonerated of taxes in the limit of 4 441€ in 2018.

If your salary is above that amount you only declare the part above that amount.

If you are a student and that you are doing an internship, your internship salary, also called “indémnités de stages” are exonerated of taxes in the limit of 17 763€.

If your salary is above that amount you only declare the part above that amount.

 

When should you declare your revenues ?

The due dates for income declaration depend on your department but they are typically available to fill out in mid-April and are due between late-May and early-June. You can download your forms online here or you may receive them in the mail. For the first time filling out, you will need to include basic information such as name, origin country, contact information when you moved to your current address and your former address. If you are planning to be a long-term resident, you can fill your income declaration out online in the future.

 

Overall, the income declaration process is painless and simple, especially for students like you. If you still have questions, don’t hesitate to ask or purchase an hour of consultation with us to help you through the process.

 

 

 

 

Habitation Tax Explained

Habitation Tax : If you’ve been living in an apartment in Paris this year, you might have received something called a tax habitation in the mail. What is it? And why dd you receive it? 

 

Habitation Tax

A tax d’habitation is a municipal tax issued by the government every year in November to be paid by January 1st to owners or tenants of property within their jurisdiction. Do not confuse this with a “taxe fonciere” which is a municipal tax to be paid by the owner of the building, not the tenant. You are liable to pay for the tax if you have been living in your current lodging since January 1st of that year. Even if you only stayed in your apartment for a couple of months, if you were in the apartment on the 1st you are required to pay.

The habitation tax is determined by the size of the apartment, the income of the owner, as well as a number of other tax factors. It can be anywhere from €90 to €3,000. When you sign the lease for your apartment (or for a student residence),  check to see if it is listed as a main residence or a second residence, as second residences have a much more expensive tax. Also, when you fill out your tax form, make sure to unclick the box that says you have a TV in the home if you do not have one, as this will also raise the price of the tax.

 Why should you pay ?

If you are still unsure whether you have to pay, the first thing you should do is review your lease agreement. Sometimes the habitation tax is included in the deposit fees for the apartment and therefore you have already paid for it. If your lease is unclear, contact your landlord and ask whether you have to pay it or not. Sometimes apartment owners in Paris do not register with the tax office that they are renting and therefore must pay the habitation tax themselves. However, this is unlikely.

If you are renting a room in an apartment or sub-renting an apartment (meaning you have a contract with the person renting the apartment not the owner) then you don’t have to pay the habitation tax.

If you are living in a public student residence, you do not have to pay this tax. However, if you are living in a private student residence, but moved in after January 1st and are living there for a short time period, you also do not have to pay the tax. If you are unsure, contact your administrative office.

Unfortunately, since you are an international student and are not a tax paying French citizen, you are not entitled to any tax reductions. Most likely, you will have to pay the tax and can do so a number of ways. You can simply take a check or mail one into your local tax office, indicating your address, identification and lease agreement. Or, you can pay online and create an account here and elect to pay the lump sum or in monthly installments. You will need your bank account details and your tax information found on the invoice you received in the mail in order to make this account.

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This is the page where you will create your account. As you can see, there are three required numbers all of which are found on your third tax d’habitation, so make sure you keep the original document. The first two numbers are found on the first page and third is found on the last page of the invoice. If you cannot find these numbers or you have lost your tax d’habitation, go to your local tax office.

The good news is that the government is planning on eradicating all of the habitation taxes by 2021. So if you are planning on living in Paris for a long time, you’re in luck!

Looking to volunteer in Paris?

Getting involved in your community during your stay in France is a great way to meet the locals and explore the city in a new way. Community service is also highly valued by employers, so it’s a great thing to have on your resume. There are several organizations in France to help you find the right job. Here are our recommendations.

 

**Warning: some of these recommendations may request that you speak French fluently. Most of the websites are in French so if you help need signing up for a job, ask us for help.

France Benevolat

This organization has the most volunteer opportunities out of any, having partnerships with over 800 French companies and 12,000 events. This organization only accepts French-speaking volunteers.

 

Disco Soup

This organization specializes in sourcing volunteers to soup kitchens and homeless shelters. You can also post service events directly on the website for other young people and students in the area to join.

 

Restos du Coeur

This organization provides a wide range of activities for volunteers, from language tutoring to working at a daycare. It is also possible to directly work for Restos du Coeur if you are looking for full-time employment.

 

Serve the City

This an English-speaking NGO that coordinates hundreds of events around the city for you to get involved with. The organization focuses their efforts on the marginalized populations in France such as the homeless, migrant and refugees, and the abused. The NGO also provides ways to get involved with Green initiatives around the city.

 

American Church in Paris

This English-speaking church sporadically posts volunteer opportunities for English speakers in Paris. Don’t rely on the website, as some of the events are outdated and may not say so. If you are really interested in this church, call  +33 (0)1 40 62 05 00.

 

Secret Spots in Paris: Visit the roads less travelled

So you’ve been in Paris for a while and you feel like you’ve seen all there is to see as far as major monuments. It’s time to explore the roads less traveled in Paris, find spots that you can call your own and assert yourself as a true Parisien. We don’t claim to know every spot in the city, but here’s a list of must-see places to get you started.

 

Amazing Architecture

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Richelieu Library

Built during the height of the Industrial Revolution, this beautiful library showcases a seamless blend of the newest technology of the time and classical architecture. The library can only be accessed by graduate art history students studying in Paris but a little sweet talking with the security guard will get you a peek.

 

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Petit Palais

An amazing art museum with an eclectic collection in its own right, the Petit Palais has one of the most beautiful interiors in Paris, in my opinion. A spectacular example of Rococo turned Romantic architecture, walking through the building feels like floating. Don’t miss the Roman-style courtyard complete with a small cafe, perfect for sunny days in Paris.

 

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Galerie Vivienne

One of the first indoor shopping malls in Paris, Galerie Vivienne is a great place to window shop or catch artisans in the middle of their craft. During Christmas, the Galerie is strung up with dazzling lights and wreaths, making it a happy surprise when one turns the corner into an unexpected winter wonderland.

 

Best Views in the City

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Galerie Lafayette

One may say the best place to see Paris is the Eiffel Tower, but then you can’t see the Eiffel Tower! The Galerie Lafayette is one of the highest points of the city and offers spectacular views of all your favorite monuments. During Christmas, the mall is decked out in twinkling lights and a huge, decorated Christmas tree. Don’t miss out!

Musée d’Orsay Balcony

On the fifth floor of the Musee d’Orsay lies a secret gem. The balcony off of the fifth-floor cafe offers stunning panoramic views of the city, stretching all the way to Montmartre. It’s a great way to end the day at the museum.

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Notre Dame Tower

Another great alternative for stunning Paris views is to climb the towers of Notre Dame. It is free for people under 26 to climb up the 422 steps for breathtaking views of Ile de Cite and the Seine.

Gardens

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Rodin Museum Gardens

The Rodin Museum is a great alternative to the crowded Musee D’Orsay and the Louvre. It has a stunning collection of Rodin’s works as well as other sculptors from the 19th century. Complete with an outdoor sculpture garden, the Rodin Museum is a perfect location for a sunny afternoon and some light reading.

Park at Pont Neuf

Fun Fact: Pont Neuf is the oldest bridge in Paris, despite its name meaning “New Bridge”. At the base of the bridge is a small park that looks out over the Seine. It’s a very popular spot for local young people to bring wine and snacks for a picnic, especially in the evenings.

Parc Bercy and Village 

If you are really looking for places off the beaten path, head to the 12th arrondissement and check out Parc Bercy. Built in the 90s to incorporate more green space into Paris, the eclectic park consists of three small gardens connected by footbridges. Next to the park is the Bercy Village, a cute shopping and dining area created out of old wine caverns.

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Place des Vosges

 A popular rest spot for local Parisiens, this park is a great place for a picnic and a nap on a sunny day. Place des Vosges is one of the only parks in Paris where people are allowed to go on the grass, so take advantage of it. Located in a former palace courtyard, the park offers views of stunning architecture and great people watching.

 

Check out this article for more secret spots in Paris. Happy exploring!

Finding Free Housing in France

Struggling to find cheap accommodations in Paris? Housing in Paris is one of the top complaints among international students because the options are slim and the prices are high. Feel Parisien is now able to offer affiliated students free accommodations through our partnerships with French tutoring programs.

If you are a native English speaker or speak English fluently without an accent, you may be eligible for this program. If accepted, you will be a private English tutor for a French family in or near Paris for three months. You will tutor in English for 15 hours a week and in return receive free room and half-board (two meals a day).

Don’t worry, you can still be a full-time student if you enter this program. The weekly schedule will revolve entirely around your academic classes. If you schedule your time right, you should be able to have weekends off!

This program is a great option for students coming to Paris looking for cheap, short-term accommodations. Even if you are staying in Paris for longer than 3 months, the program gives you the opportunity to save some money and search for housing in person instead of online. Also, more housing options open up after September because there are fewer students looking for accommodations. 

Another bonus is that the visa application only requires proof of residence for three months in France, so this program is a great option if you are struggling to find other arrangements in time to apply for your visa.

Staying with a host family is a great first initiation into life in France. It is a great opportunity to practice your French and to learn more about French culture and home life. Who knows, through your host family, you might even meet some French friends!

If you are interested in this program, indicate such on the platform or contact us for more information.

Need to escape Paris? Try these weekend excursions

You’re only a true Parisien when you desperately want to leave Paris for the weekend on excursions. Fortunately, France has innumerable cute, quaint towns to visit on the weekend for little to no cost. Seeing places outside Paris is a great way to experience different parts of French culture that are removed from the bustling urban life of Paris.

These locations are reachable by the RER via your Imagine R or Navigo Pass. Check out these excursions in Paris :

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Versailles

The automatic go-to excursion for any tourist visiting Paris is, of course, the magnificent palace and grounds of King Louis XVI. Easily reached by train, it’s only 45 minutes on the RER C to Gare de Versailles Château Rive Gauche from Saint-Michel. Both the palace and gardens are free every day for students except for the weekends when there are musical fountain shows in the gardens. Don’t be distracted by the palace and miss out on the other attractions in the gardens, such as Marie Antoinette’s private palace and the working farm complete with cows and chickens. It’s a great place to visit in nice weather: have a picnic by one of the many hidden fountains, rent a rowboat on the Grand Canal, or bike ride through the forests.

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Fontainebleau

Visit Fontainebleau to see where the Habsburg monarchy in France resided, including Napoleon and his family. This small town is located in Zone 5 of the metro system, only 45 minutes on the RER D from Gare de Lyon to Fontainbleau-Avon towards either Laroche-Migennes, Montargis, Montereau, or Sens. These trains are in the main hall with the other trains, called the Grandes Lignes, typically on platform J. Don’t go downstairs and take the regular RER D near the other RER lines. If you get turned around, ask for help from a station guide! The castle and gardens at Fontainebleau are a great alternative to the Versailles crowds and excessive grandeur. The castle takes about 2 hours to go through and is very beautiful and well restored. There are three gardens open to the public: The English Garden, The French Garden and the park, the original hunting grounds of Emperor Napoleon.

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Disneyland

A magical place always worth a visit if you’re willing to spend a couple extra bucks. The park is about 40 minutes on the RER A from Chatelet towards Gare de Marine La Vallee Chessy. There are two parks at Disneyland, Disney Studios and Parc Disneyland. Disney Studios is more movie-making focused, with a special Ratatouille attraction, while Parc Disneyland has all the traditional rides and characters you know and love. If you stretch yourself and arrive early, you can do both parks in one day; however, if you’re only planning to do one park, choose Parc Disneyland for the quintessential Disney experience.

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St. Denis

If you’re like me and love seeing old architecture, don’t miss out on St. Denis Cathedral, only 15 minutes on the RER D from Chatelet to Gare D’Orry la Ville Coye la Foret. The cathedral at St. Denis is the first example of Gothic architecture in Europe, built by Abbot Suger in the 12th century. It’s a perfect short trip for history buffs who have exhausted the historical sights in Paris.

 

The following locations are reachable by SNCF trains for very low costs if you book in advance.

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Giverny

The home and gardens of famous Impressionist painter Claude Monet are a must-see in the spring and summer months. The train to Vernon-Giverny is usually less than €10 if you book in advance and the joint ticket for the house, gardens and impressionist museum cost about €8 for students. My advice? Bring a book and some headphones and waste a sunny day under a weeping willow looking out over the water lilies. Then when you head back to Paris, visit Musee de L’Orangerie and complete your exploration of Claude Monet by seeing his water lily masterpieces.

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Rouen

If you like old architecture and history, Rouen is for you. The small town boasts the most elaborate and decorative cathedral I’ve ever seen and excellent examples of Tudor style houses. The town is also the sight of Joan of Arc’s burning and one of the oldest operating clocks in Europe. Don’t miss the art museum for a great collection of European and Impressionism art. On a weekend, especially during the holiday season, you might get lucky and be able to enjoy tasty local treats at the markets. 

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Reims

Though I would recommend a weekend trip for the land of Champagne, the ambitious traveler can squeeze it all into a day. This small town has one of the most charming city centers I’ve seen, a long strip of pedestrian space with cute cafes and shops. Again, for you art and history lovers out there, Reims is home to another old, grand cathedral, Notre Dame de Reims. But let’s not forget about the Champagne! Reims is home to a number of famous champagne houses, like G.H. Mumm and Pommery. Most houses are open to the public for tours and tastings, a must-do experience. 

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Strasbourg

If you need a break from total French immersion but don’t want to leave the country, Strasbourg is the place for you. Right on the border of Germany, Strasbourg is a mix of German and French culture in every way. Visit the Grand Île and Petite France to travel back in time amongst ancient timbered houses and winding streets. Don’t miss a trip to the top of the Strasbourg Cathedral’s North Tower, where you can see all the way to the Black Forest in Germany. The food and drink are incomparable, the perfect combination between German and French cuisine.

 

Have you visited somewhere amazing that’s not on this list? Let us know! We’d love to hear about your adventures in France.

Need furniture for your Paris flat?

Moving to a new apartment in a foreign country is hard enough without having to worry about furnishing it from scratch. Buying furniture can be expensive, but not if you know where to look. Read this article for our recommendations for affordable places to buy furniture in Paris.

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New Furniture

Tati

Tati is a great source for cheap household goods in Paris, with many locations across the country and in Paris. See a full list here. The store is a one-stop shop for everything you could need, from appliances to utensils, to even clothing.

 

Maisons du Monde

This store is a great option for the stylish decorator, known for its cute decor and modern furniture. They are frequently having sales so check them out for some bargains on quality furnishings. See all locations in Paris here.

 

Ikea

Everybody’s favorite build-it-yourself store, Ikea is always a good option for affordable goods. Unfortunately, there is no location in Paris but one is coming soon, hopefully by Summer of 2019. Otherwise make the trek to the branch outside the city, accessible by the bus stop at 77 Boulevard Saint-Jacques or by car. I do not recommend this if you do not have a car, as the bus can be unreliable and it can be difficult to transport all your furniture back by yourself. Ordering online is your safest bet. 

New location: 15 Boulevard de la Madeleine, 75001 Paris

 

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Used Furniture

Le Bon Coin

Le Bon Coin is a French online trading site for anything from used furniture to hand-me-down shoes. You can find some great deals here so don’t miss out. I would recommend being a good French speaker or at least having one nearby in order to successfully complete transactions. This site is also a good option for selling furniture when you leave Paris.

 

Emmaus

The equivalent of Goodwill for you Americans out there, Emmaus is a great option for second-hand items of all shapes and sizes. An NGO and donation-based, Emmaus will be your cheapest option for household items. It is also a great place to donate your furniture when you leave Paris. Check the website for all store locations in Paris. 

 

Happy bargain hunting!

Top Feel-Good Things to Bring to Paris

The hardest thing about packing up your belongings and moving away is choosing what to bring. You have limited room in your suitcases and can’t afford to bring everything with you. But it’s also so important to bring things that remind you of home when you go to a new, unknown place. Whether it be a photograph or a teddy bear, a familiar item will go a long way in making your temporary, foreign residence feel like home.

We asked some students about what things they brought with them to Paris. Below you’ll see a compiled list of all the must-need items you shouldn’t leave home without.

Favorite book 

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You can’t be a true Parisien without a go-to novel for those long commutes on the metro. Also perfect for relaxing in one of the many jardins on a sunny day! Cecily D. said she could not have lived without her favorite book, The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker. Check it out here!

Pictures of family and friends

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Homesickness can get the best of us sometimes so it’s always nice to have some familiar faces close by. Print out pictures at home to save some money and hang them up in Paris. Trust me it helps brighten up the room and bring a little bit of home to Paris.

A Sketchbook

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Channel your inner artist in the city of art and bring a sketchbook along to Paris for those “en plein air” painting and drawing opportunities. Sasha C. said one of her favorite things to do is go to the Louvre with her sketchbook and fill the pages with drawings.

Slippers

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France gets chilly in the winter and not all accommodations have central heating, so your favorite fuzzy slippers can help you through those long, cold months. Raul R. said he actually had his family mail him his slippers because he forgot them at home. Don’t make the same mistake!

A Journal

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Your time in Paris may not be permanent so it’s important to keep a record of your French adventures so you can look back at what will definitely be the best time of your life. If you forget to bring one, head to Gibert Jeune, a paper product store that can be found anywhere in Paris. 

Brands of medicine that you know and use

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The worst thing about being sick in a foreign place is not having your favorite, go-to medicine for an easy fix. Stock up and bring your favorite brands for any medical emergency, and save some euros in advance doing it. My personal favorite medicine is only available in certain stores back home, so I made sure I packed a ton because I always get sick in the winter.

Adapters

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Be sure to pack plenty of adapters when you come abroad, and not just European ones. Who knows where your travels might take you! A lot of adapters come in joint sets that include the UK, Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Camille O. said she borrowed her parents’ adapters for her year in Paris and is glad she did because most of her friends had to buy new ones and they can be very expensive.

Ladies, stock up on your favorite beauty products

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Not only will this save you money in the long run, bringing your favorite products from home will save you the hassle of having to find a foreign replacement when you inevitably run out of mascara. Unless you’re a Sephora customer, the likelihood of finding your favorite brands like Maybelline and Covergirl are slim. Maria L. said she had packed extra of her favorite brand of concealer on impulse and is glad she did because she hasn’t found it in Paris anywhere.

Your favorite snacks from home

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When the homesickness bug bites, sometimes the only cure are your favorite munchies. Bring some from home for emergency situations. Sarah T. said one of the things she misses most about home is the candy brands. When her friends came to visit on break, she had them bring her all her favorites! 

Favorite stuffed animal

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Just like the photographs and snacks, sometimes a friendly, cuddly face can cure the blues. Robert F. said he’ll never admit it but his stuffed shark that his girlfriend gave him has been comforting when he’s missed home the most.

Decorative art, posters, tapestries

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Just because your accommodations might be temporary doesn’t mean they don’t have to feel like a home. Bring your favorite home decor to add some color and pep to your apartment. If you’re still needing some decor inspiration for your room, check out Redbubble for some great products!

Happy packing and good luck with your move to France!

How to Apply for the CAF

CAF is rental assistance allocated to those that qualify by the government. CAF is a great resource for international students who need financial aid. If you are living in a studio apartment, you can earn as much as €200 euros a month. If you are living in a shared flat, you can earn as much as €180 a month. Read on to see if you qualify for CAF and how to apply.

The following are the requirements to be eligible for the CAF:

Low income 

As a student, you most likely have a low income, typically under €10,000 a year, and thus qualify. The CAF also takes full-time students into consideration. On the application, simply declare your total income for the last two years. If you are required to provide proof, your tax returns for the last two years from your home country should do the trick.

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Qualified housing

If you intend to apply for CAF and are looking at apartments, verify that the apartment qualifies for CAF before you sign the lease. First, it must be a year-long lease in your own name. You must have your landlord sign the application, which they might refuse to do due to possible tax scrutiny by CAF. If you are living in student housing, you will most likely qualify but you should confirm with the administration to be sure. Also, if you are living with roommates, make sure they also qualify for CAF when you apply, as that can impact your acceptance.

Have a valid student Visa with OFII 

You cannot receive CAF without these documents. If you do not have an OFII upon arrival in France, apply for one immediately. Check the platform to see if you have access to our OFII services. 

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Have a French bank account

The rental assistance will be paid to you directly or to your landlord. In the case of the first option, you will need a French bank account. 

 

If you wish to run a simulation of what your CAF will be, visit this website.

In order to apply for the CAF, simply go to their website and fill out the online application.  We recommend that you apply as soon as you secure accommodation. The CAF payments will begin the second month of your lease, so if it is possible to move in at the end of August and pay half rent, do so, as the payments will then begin in September instead of October. Do not be concerned if you do not receive payments right away. It often takes several weeks or even months for the application to go through, but you will still receive payments for the entirety of the year, sometimes in the form of a lump sum. 

If you are struggling with your application, Feel Parisien offers services that will help you complete the application, walking you through the process step by step until you have received your CAF. If you do not have access to our CAF services, reach out to your university about obtaining them. 

TIPS for CAF

You will collect the aid from the following month of the application of your lease. Of course you need to wait to move-in in your flat  to be able to apply.

If you move-in in Sept and apply during this month, the aid will start in Oct but if you move-in in Sept but apply only in Oct, your aid will start in Nov.

f your lease starts the 31st of August and you’re applying this day, your aid will starts the 1st of Sept.

If your lease starts the 1st of Sept and you are applying this month, your aid will start the 1st of October.

So when you ask for an accommodation contract, ask for it to start at the end of the month instead of the beginning, to not loose one month.

You won’t receive the aid until you apply for it on the Internet. That’s mean if your lease start in Sept but you wait until Oct to ask for it, you will be eligible to earn the aid from Oct. So even if you don’t have all the documents required, such as the birth certificate or its translation in French, we sugget you to apply for it before the month of Oct so you won’t lost one or several months of aid. You will be able to send your documents later by post or upload them online, and the date of your online application will considered as the begining of your aid.

Thanksgiving in Paris

Thanks to the large number of American expats living in Paris, there are many options in the city for those that want to celebrate this US holiday. Whether you’re looking for something traditional or something a bit more French-inspired, you’ll find it in Paris. Read this article to get good tips, whether you want to cook a Thanksgiving feast yourself or go out.

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Finding Ingredients 

Butterball turkeys are definitely not something you can just go and pick up at your local Monoprix. In order to find the best ingredients and supplies for your Thanksgiving Feast, visit one of the vendors below.

Costco

3 ave de Bréhat, 91140 Villebon-sur-Yvette

Believe it or not, there is a Costco in France! It’s a bit of a trek outside the city but can be the one-stop shop for everything you need on the big day. Click here to see their Thanksgiving Day deals and learn how you can get your turkey in advance.

The Real McCoy

194 Rue de Grenelle

This small grocery store has all the American products you would ever need in life, and especially for Thanksgiving. Email them at us.food@wanadoo.fr or visit their Facebook page to directly chat with them about placing your order.

 

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Restaurant Recommendations 

Check out these restaurants where you can find a good, old American Thanksgiving feast or something with just a little French twist.

Ô Chateau,  68 Rue Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Reserve your spot at Ô Chateau now for a traditional three-course Thanksgiving meal with wine and dessert accompaniments. Dinner times are at 7 pm and 9 pm on Thursday.

Breakfast in America, 17 rue des Ecoles

For a more casual feast, head to this American diner offering three sittings on Thursday: 5 pm, 7 pm, and 9 pm. Reserve now by email at bia.thanksgiving@gmail.com.

À La Folie, 26 Avenue Corentin Carlou

Ever dreamed about a disco Thanksgiving? Dream no longer. Head to À La Folie for a modern take on Thanksgiving, complete with a live DJ and buffet-style meal. Reserve your spot here.

Le Coq Rico, 98 rue Lepic

Look no further for your French-inspired Thanksgiving. Offered both at lunchtime and dinnertime, experience a Thanksgiving meal based around the red turkey of Ardennes at Le Coq Rico. Reserve your spot here.

 

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Happy Thanksgiving and remember to wear stretchy pants!